Sunday, April 24, 2011

Luo Han Guo Fruit

The Luo Han Guo Fruit, Siraitia grosvenorii also known as arhat, monk's, or buddha fruit is a perennial vine used in chinese medicine and as a sweetener.  I have only seen it used as a tea.  The whole fruit was broke into pieces and steeped in almost boiling water.  I planted these many months ago, none of them germinated, and then this one appeared about 4 weeks ago.  I'm not sure if it is self-fertile so it may never produce fruit.  The plant is native to the mountains of southern China where they get filtered light, mildly warm temperatures, and humid air. I had directly under a fluorescent light and it got yellow spots.  So the strategy is to mimic that environment.  The plant is therefore being kept indoors in a minigreenhouse where it is humid and not too bright.

6 comments:

  1. Let me know tall they are now?

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  2. wherethewildgreensgrowAugust 26, 2011 at 11:07 PM

    Sorry to dissapoint, but I have lost them. I had two left, and I've searched all of my garden spaces and I can't find them. I give a lot of plants away so they may have inadvertently moved out. They were a bout 20" tall about a month ago, really slow growing for a cucurbitaceae. Thanks for the comment.

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  3. I am interested in trying to grow one of these. Love the fruit. Any advice? I live in Portland, or, thanks
    Lcmag@ymail.com

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  4. I live in Florida planted 30 or more seeds and one did come up and is looking good it was a little cool so I am going to plant again, I have high hopes one the one I do have ( will give you a update )Cedarkeycaptain@Gmail.com If you know something I don't would like to hear from you

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  5. I just bought some seeds , can any one help me to start ?
    Do I need to soak the seeds before planting ?
    I have about 20 seeds ,

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  6. You can check out my directions for sowing seeds in my March 2011 post called Sowing Time. I would avoid the presoaking as they take so long to germinate, it may increase the risk of molding. A well watered warm patch of soil for up to 2 months will do the trick.
    I couldn't figure out why I couldn't post a comment, so I eventually switched browsers to do so. Sorry to everyone who I haven't got back to or that I've commented late on.

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